Culinary Herbs

In the flavoring of prepared dishes we Americans – people, as the French say, “of one sauce” – might well learn a lesson from the example of the English matron who usually considers her kitchen incomplete without a dozen or more sweet herbs, either powdered, or in decoction, or preserved in both ways.

culinaryherbs

A glance into a French or a German culinary department would probably show more than a score,

but a careful search in an American kitchen would rarely reveal as many as half a dozen

and in the great majority probably only parsley and sage would be brought to light.

Yet these humble plants possess the power of rendering even unpalatable and insipid dishes piquant and appetizing

and this, too, at a surprisingly low cost.

Indeed, most of them may be grown in an out-of-the-way corner of the garden,

or if no garden be available,

in a box of soil upon a sunny windowsill – a method adopted by many foreigners living in tenement houses in New York and Jersey City.

Certainly, they may be made to add to the pleasure of living and, as Solomon declares, “better is a dinner of herbs where love is, than a stalled ox with contention.”

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65 orange recipes

65 Orange Recipes –

Oranges belong to the group of citrus fruits, but they differ from both lemons and grapefruit in that they contain more sugar and less acid.

orangerecipes

Probably no citrus fruit is used so extensively as oranges.

Because of their refreshing sub-acid flavor, they are much eaten in their fresh state, both alone and in combination with other foods in numerous salads and desserts!

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Understanding The No Carb Diet

A no carb diet is different from a low carb diet. It is more intense because you’re allowed zero carbohydrate intake.

There must be an alternative source of energy in your diet. Fat will be the main source, and protein is another backup. The bulk of your intake on a no carb diet will be cheese, fish, egg and meat.

The natural consequence of this is a ketogenic state as the fat consumed is converted into ketones.

Oxidization of fat is not the regular setting of your metabolic processes which typically depend on carbohydrates.

For this reason, a strict no carb diet should ideally be vetted by a physician, especially if you have any medical conditions which could make it dangerous to try.

To qualify for the category of zero carb diet, your total daily intake should not exceed 50 grams of carbohydrate.

However, even when you eat more than that, there’s a chance that you’ll continue losing weight.

Preparing for a no carb diet

It’s hard to get started on such a strict dietary regimen without prior preparation.

Give yourself time to prepare for it.

Draw up a list of food items that are allowed.

Don’t assume that because this is a tough diet, it won’t be delicious.

There are many tasty items that can be eaten even on such a protocol.

Creativity is the key in enjoying your restricted diet.

Be ready and willing to try out different new recipes and meal plans.

First, assess how many carb calories you are permitted to eat every day.

This will depend on your weight loss goals and current body weight.

You’ll quickly realize that eating fewer carbs changes and optimizes your body composition and proportion, leaving you in better metabolic health and with improved levels of health biomarkers.

The good news is that when you make sure your glucose and glycogen levels are enough to replenish cellular stores, you will not feel tired or weak even on a strictly carb restricted diet.

Few dieters complain of fatigue, low energy or feeling dull mentally.

There is one caveat with very low carb diets.

You cannot get enough calories if you’re an active person.

Anyone who runs, jogs, skis or is active physically over prolonged durations can manage an adequate calorie intake without including carbs in the diet.

Under such circumstances, starving your body of carbohydrates can lead to tiredness, muscle aches, bone loss and reduced performance.

That is not a desirable situation and your diet plan needs modification.

The Different types of Vegetarians



Many people think of vegetarians as one homogeneous group that just doesn’t eat meat.

But nothing could be further from the truth. There are different categories of vegetarians as diverse as the reasons for going vegetarian in the first place.

A vegetarian is generally defined as someone who doesn’t eat meat. But someone who is vegetarian could conceivably eat dairy products such as milk, eggs and cheese.

A lacto ovo vegetarian doesn’t eat meat, fish or poultry, but does consume eggs, milk or cheese.

A lacto vegetarian consumes milk and cheese products, but doesn’t consume eggs.

A vegan is someone who doesn’t consume any animal product or by-product, including dairy food. They eat only vegetables, fruits, nuts, grains and legumes. They also don’t use animal products, such as leather. Vegans also don’t use white sugar because it’s often processed with a substance derived from animal bones that whitens the sugar.

There are other categories within the vegetarian community.

Fruitarians, for example, eat only fruit. Their rationale is that fruits, including fruits such as tomatoes, are self-perpetuating and don’t need to be planted to create the food source. They consider it a way of eating that’s most in balance and harmony with the earth, the most natural.

All of the above will eat cooked vegetables, fruits and legumes.

There is also a growing movement towards eating only raw or living foods. This based on the assumption that cooking food processes most of the nutrients out of it, and to get all the nutritional value, vitamins and amino acids from food, it’s best consumed raw, or juiced. If cooked at all, it should only be cooked to slightly over 100 degrees, so the nutrients are still retained.

The more restrictive you become with your diet, however, the more educated you need to become to be sure you’re getting all the necessary proteins and vitamins that you need to maintain good health, especially muscle and heart health.